GDPR One Year On

Vending Insight 37: GDPR One Year On – What Have We Learned?

Hello again and welcome to Vending Insight 37, ‘GDPR One Year On’, brought to you with the assistance of our friends at Vianet Smart Machines in association with Vendman, the UK’s Number One ERP software for vending operators.

GDPR One Year On (Private Sec Report)

What have we learned over this past year? Do companies have a full grip with compliance requirements for data collection and processing? How serious have Data Protection Authorities (DPAs) been about enforcement? And how has GDPR impacted other national data protection regulations? Questions answered HERE

GDPR One Year OnGDPR One Year On (The Institute of Directors)

Despite the publicity that swirled around the new regulation – and those incessant GDPR related emails – there is still a lack of awareness amongst business owners when it comes to the consequences of failing to meet the new requirements. According to a Hiscox survey amongst SMEs, over a third do not know who GDPR affects. In addition, a further 10% of SMEs don’t think that consumers have any new rights following the introduction of GDPR. After all that… HERE

GDPR One Year On: How Are EU Regulators Flexing Their Muscles? (Osborne Clarke)

So far, the evidence of any significant enforcement activity is slim; European Data Protection Authorities (DPAs) continue to wade through very high work volumes, not least in dealing with over 50,000 data breach notifications since the GDPR came into force on 25 May 2018. But, we are starting to see examples of the type of conduct that is likely to jump the data enforcement queue (as well as grab media attention), and the tools that DPAs are ready and willing to use. Find out more HERE

How Is The GDPR Doing? (Slate)

It’s been almost a year since the EU’s data privacy regulation went into effect. It’s been very successful in one regard, but largely failed in another. The low-down, HERE

GDPR One Year Anniversary – Infographic (iapp)

Companies and regulators alike worked hard to prepare for and then implement GDPR requirements. Both saw increases in staff and resources, but those paled in comparison to the influx of complaints, data breach notifications, fines and data protection officer registrations. According to IAPP research, an estimated 500,000 organizations have registered DPOs across Europe. What can we learn from this intense activity? Check out this new IAPP infographic to learn about GDPR’s first year in numbers.

GDPR One Year On

 

General Data Protection Regulation: One Year On (The European Commission)

On 25 May 2019, the General Data Protection Regulation reached its first year of entry into application. To mark the occasion, Andrus Ansip, Vice-President for the Digital Single Market and Věra Jourová, Commissioner for Justice, Consumers and Gender Equality, issued the statement you can read HERE

GDPR – One Year On (A blog by Elizabeth Denham, Of The Information Commissioner’s Office)

The change in the regulatory landscape has shown the importance of getting privacy right. People have woken up to the new rights the GDPR delivers, with increased protection for the public and increased obligations for organisations. But there is much more still to do to build the public’s trust and confidence. With the initial hard work of preparing for and implementing the GDPR behind us, there are ongoing challenges of operationalising and normalising the new regime. This is true for businesses and organisations of all size. A good read, HERE

GDPR One Year On: Measured Enforcement Is Just The Beginning (Techradar)

IGDPR One Year Onn its first 12 months, the European Commission has demonstrated strong yet measured implementation, with fines totalling over €56 million hitting 91 companies, including €50 million against a single organisation. A significant amount, yet a fraction of the full 4% of companies’ total global revenue they could have levied – a difference of billion. It’s all HERE

GDPR One Year On: No Fines But Considerable Amounts Of Dread (The Irish Times)

Rarely have four letters caused such dread. GDPR – the EU law designed to give people more control over their personal data in the internet age – celebrates its first birthday today. The arrival of the General Data Protection Regulation was heralded with a high-profile public awareness campaign that informed people of their new rights around their personal information and warned businesses of their responsibility about how they used this information. The Irish view is HERE

One Year On, What Has Been The Impact Of GDPR On Data Security? (Intelligent CIS)

The 2019 Cyber Security Breaches Survey shows that 32% of businesses identified a cyberattack in the last 12 months – down from 43% the previous year. The reduction, the government says, is partly due to the introduction of tough new data laws under the Data Protection Act and the General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR). More HERE

We hope you enjoyed this unusual issue, Vending Insight 37, with its single theme. Vending Insight 38 will be with you next week. See you then.

Meanwhile, Planet Vending’s Vending Insight Archive is HERE

 

About the author

The Editor

Planet Vending’s Editor is Ian Reynolds-Young and it’s Ian’s unique writing talent that has made PV what it is today – the best read (red) vending blog in the world, and vending’s best read (reed). Ian ‘tripped and fell into vending’, in the capacity of PR executive, before launching a specialist agency, ‘reynoldscopy’, dedicated to the UK Vending business. The company continues to represent the interests of many of the sector’s leading brands.

‘It’s all about telling stories’, he says. ‘We want to make every visit to PV a rewarding experience. By celebrating the achievements of the UK’s operating companies, we’re on a mission to debunk the idea that vending is retailing’s poor relation.’

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